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Digital List Price:    511.35
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The Discomfort of Evening: WINNER OF THE BOOKER INTERNATIONAL PRIZE 2020 by [Marieke Lucas Rijneveld, Michele Hutchison]
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The Discomfort of Evening: WINNER OF THE BOOKER INTERNATIONAL PRIZE 2020 Kindle Edition

4.0 out of 5 stars 2,034 ratings

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Book Description

*WINNER OF THE BOOKER INTERNATIONAL PRIZE 2020*: this sensational Dutch bestseller is 'a classic' (Max Porter) --This text refers to the paperback edition.

Review

One of the best debut novels I have ever read. Shockingly good. Utterly unforgettable ... A classic. -- Max Porter

Few reading experiences are more thrilling than a first novel that feels urgent and original. In the past decade, Teju Cole and Garth Greenwell both had these qualities ... As exhilarating a debut as I can remember.i

Intensely raw, shockingly graphic, and memorable ... Rijneveld has created something exceptional.Financial Times

Translator Michele Hutchison deftly switches between registers and gives Jas a strong, unique voice ... Poetic, mannered language, realistic bleakness and descent into surreal darkness ... Compelling ... Fascinating characters and themes.Guardian (Book of the Day)

Translated by Michele Hutchison, Rijneveld's writing is raw and impassive, though often grotesquely vivid ... A pretty remarkable debut. Confident in its brutality, yet contained rather than gratuitous, it introduces readers to both a memorably off-key narrator and a notable new talent.Observer

An earthy and irreverent new voice, thrillingly uninhibited in style and subject matter ... The novel teems - I say this admiringly - with all the filth of life ... Even now, my blood jumps to remember certain images ... I went to it every day [with] gratitude ... The spaciousness of Rijneveld's imagination comes as terror and solace. ― New York Times

The most talked-about debut novel of 2020 ... Absolutely compelling ... Brutal and vivid.Dazed & Confused

An unsettling exploration of a family dealing with a sudden death . . . A strong debut. Rijneveld's poetic prose, eloquently translated by Michele Hutchison, clashes and rattles against the horrors it describes, a constant fight between terror and beauty. It is a novel that does its best to make sure you won't forget it anytime soon.Irish Times

Rijneveld takes us into the bleak Dutch countryside, into a family's grief, and inside the mind of a girl who is in hiding from her own life. This beautiful, strange novel is filled with sentences that stopped me dead. -- Chris Power

Astoundingly accomplished ... Shudderingly vivid ... A stunning novel that does what a child's-eye narrative should do: reveal that, in the face of adult folly, a ten-year-old can show us the world as it really is.Literary Review

A visceral portrait of a devout family dealing with grief and the result is both haunting and beautiful.Monocle

The electricity in this book comes from the use of that blank narrative style to deliver a sort of Grand Guignol grotesquerie.The Times

Marked by intense, poignant imagery and the stirring narration of middle daughter Jas, Marieke Lucas has done something quite extraordinary with this astonishing (and really quite disgusting) novel, which will stay in the mind long after reading.AnOther --This text refers to the paperback edition.

Product details

  • ASIN ‏ : ‎ B07YM4W1D8
  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ Faber & Faber (3 March 2020)
  • Language ‏ : ‎ English
  • File size ‏ : ‎ 355 KB
  • Text-to-Speech ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • Screen Reader ‏ : ‎ Supported
  • Enhanced typesetting ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • X-Ray ‏ : ‎ Not Enabled
  • Word Wise ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • Print length ‏ : ‎ 298 pages
  • Customer Reviews:
    4.0 out of 5 stars 2,034 ratings

Customer reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
4 out of 5
2,034 global ratings
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Top reviews from India

Reviewed in India on 5 May 2020
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24 people found this helpful
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Reviewed in India on 23 October 2020
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5.0 out of 5 stars Familial Grief
By Singh, R. on 23 October 2020
I am sure at some point we have always asked a child why they are sad and they have always answered with whatever it was that saddened them. We give them the toy they want or let them watch the cartoons they wish and think we have found the solution to their unhappiness. We have come to believe for children, sadness is momentary. But does it end at that? Do we wonder how they imagine grief? What sadness means within their minds? Do they really have the words to articulate it as powerfully as they imagine it? Rijneveld does that in her Booker-winning, debut novel. It is a story narrated by a young girl living in the rural areas of Netherlands. As she opens the doors of her home, we witness the pain and grief that has overtaken this Dutch family. We see the pain of loneliness from the eyes of a little girl making sense of her religious parents and her violent, grieving siblings. The author uncaps the mind of a child and imagines what loss must feel like to one; a loss that’s especially violent in its nature. It’s always been a tussle to read literature without letting the personal overshadow the narrative. I felt voices rise in me and stir memories that I wished to keep repressed. Childhood may be momentary but the grief one experiences remains permanently etched into our being when childhood has long died before our eyes. Although I struggled a little initially with the writing, I got used to it as I continued listening to the cold, detached voice that spoke with pessimism about a family, a village, a religion, an occupations and its dystopia. The pessimism running through the text disappointed me a little but I will choose to ignore that against the complexity of childhood the translator (@michelehutchison )has rightly captured from the author’s (@mariekelucasrijneveld )words. Certainly, I cannot wait to read what more the author has to offer in the future.
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15 people found this helpful
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Reviewed in India on 2 October 2020
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7 people found this helpful
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Reviewed in India on 11 September 2020
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5.0 out of 5 stars Death, Dark, Damaged.
By L on 11 September 2020
This is not for everyone. People who want books to uplift their mood and escape into a fantasy world should keep away from it.
This book is for the people looking for honest, scathing and subversive stories peering into the darkness of the human mind.
It won Booker international so that says for itself.
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5 people found this helpful
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Reviewed in India on 16 July 2021
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Top reviews from other countries

Lola
2.0 out of 5 stars A study of grief.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 17 May 2020
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77 people found this helpful
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Cherie
2.0 out of 5 stars If you need to go to dark places, this is for you, otherwise avoid..
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 12 May 2020
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55 people found this helpful
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Aimes
1.0 out of 5 stars Disturbing and not worth it
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 5 May 2020
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57 people found this helpful
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Maria Francesca
1.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing,dreadful and dreary.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 15 July 2020
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24 people found this helpful
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HLeuschel
5.0 out of 5 stars Stunning prose!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 26 March 2020
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24 people found this helpful
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