Customer Review

Reviewed in India on 30 June 2020
I received this as a gift when I noted I was looking for another food scale after mine went on the blitz.<br /><br />As a someone who coaches others how to lose weight, the first step we all know is accountability and weighing food intake so you know what you are consuming. The fact that this scale makes it easy to look up foods seemed like a dream scale.<br /><br />As someone with a trained culinary background I also know an accurate scale is far better than measuring cups in baking.<br /><br />So why the low rating?<br /><br />To my confusion, after realizing I continued to get varied weights on the same item and innacurate weights from what the packaging of products stated, I began to compare weights with my neighbors scale (bear in mind packaging weights can vary from what is inside but this never could get even the weight of a known weight correct.)<br />So...I then looked at the manufacturer's description of the scale on the website and on Amazon.<br /><br />Know why it's not accurate? It's only programmed with an accuracy level to 0.1 ounces. Is this the norm for food scales? No, but you do find it on some others. Many cheap once have an accuracy of 0.05 ounces. Twice as good as this expensive one.<br />In case of doubt, you'll find this on this product page which you may not know is not a great accuracy until you compare it to other scales...and most who buy this may not be chefs, but just needed calorie accuracy so they wouldn't know what to look for:<br /><br />Calculate calories, carbs, fiber, sodium, fats, vitamin k and six other nutrients from thousands of packaged and 999 whole foods<br />White backlight with on/off button for conserving battery life<br />Memory Mode - save up to 99 entries for daily or weekly tracking<br />Weighs in grams (to nearest whole gram) and ounces (to nearest .1 ounce); Max weight 11 pounds<br />Tare feature, auto power off, runs on 4AAA batteries (included); 2 Year Warranty & Guarantee<br /><br />Inaccurate measurements equaling 500 calories per day equals 3,500 calories per week which is a pound gained per week. (3,500 calories is equal to one pound) While it would probably not add up to that much in variance, if I want a calorie scale I don't want the cheap ones to beat this one out in accuracy because accuracy is the most important aspect of a scale in order to accurately count calories.<br /><br />I can buy a very cheap digital scale with an accuracy of 0.05 oz rather than 0.1 ounce resolution as this has.<br /><br />That's just too high of a variance in weight for someone who is using it to get accurate calorie counts and if you aren't buying it for that, why would you pay so much more for the calorie calculator on it?<br /><br />But I use it for baking a lot too. That kind of variance won't help me there either even though it's not huge, if the scale itself weighs in slightly inaccurate on top of that then we can get some big variances and that much variance in salt or yeast etc. is not what a baker wants either.<br /><br />There are amazing calorie counters on smart phone apps as well as free ones on the internet. So for them to put the money into the calculator and a scale with high variance for this price rather than giving a more accurate scale seems very odd to me, except I would imagine most people wouldn't know to look.<br /><br />So I returned this...and spent the next several weeks comparing scales. I got one with 0.05 accuracy and it can fit in a drawer, I have a calorie counting book and a phone app. While this was a free gift to me, paying a few and staying thinner is a better bet to me long term.<br /><br />Do I love the calculator? I do. I think it's a brilliant idea but it attaching it to a poor scale lends it useless unfortunately. But I gave it an extra star for the calculator.<br /><br />Another issue? They included packaged foods in the calorie listing. From coaching others in weight loss one of the first things they learn is how often the calories on food pack. So this is awesome. I received this as a gift when I noted I was looking for another food scale after mine went on the blitz.<br /><br />As a someone who coaches others how to lose weight, the first step we all know is accountability and weighing food intake so you know what you are consuming. The fact that this scale makes it easy to look up foods seemed like a dream scale.<br /><br />As someone with a trained culinary background I also know an accurate scale is far better than measuring cups in baking.<br /><br />So why the low rating?<br /><br />To my confusion, after realizing I continued to get varied weights on the same item and innacurate weights from what the packaging of products stated, I began to compare weights with my neighbors scale (bear in mind packaging weights can vary from what is inside but this never could get even the weight of a known weight correct.)<br />So...I then looked at the manufacturer's description of the scale on the website and on Amazon.<br /><br />Know why it's not accurate? It's only programmed with an accuracy level to 0.1 ounces. Is this the norm for food scales? No, but you do find it on some others. Many cheap once have an accuracy of 0.05 ounces. Twice as good as this expensive one.<br />In case of doubt, you'll find this on this product page which you may not know is not a great accuracy until you compare it to other scales...and most who buy this may not be chefs, but just needed calorie accuracy so they wouldn't know what to look for:<br /><br />Calculate calories, carbs, fiber, sodium, fats, vitamin k and six other nutrients from thousands of packaged and 999 whole foods<br />White backlight with on/off button for conserving battery life<br />Memory Mode - save up to 99 entries for daily or weekly tracking<br />Weighs in grams (to nearest whole gram) and ounces (to nearest .1 ounce); Max weight 11 pounds<br />Tare feature, auto power off, runs on 4AAA batteries (included); 2 Year Warranty & Guarantee<br /><br />Inaccurate measurements equaling 500 calories per day equals 3,500 calories per week which is a pound gained per week. (3,500 calories is equal to one pound) While it would probably not add up to that much in variance, if I want a calorie scale I don't want the cheap ones to beat this one out in accuracy because accuracy is the most important aspect of a scale in order to accurately count calories.<br /><br />I can buy a very cheap digital scale with an accuracy of 0.05 oz rather than 0.1 ounce resolution as this has.<br /><br />That's just too high of a variance in weight for someone who is using it to get accurate calorie counts and if you aren't buying it for that, why would you pay so much more for the calorie calculator on it?<br /><br />But I use it for baking a lot too. That kind of variance won't help me there either even though it's not huge, if the scale itself weighs in slightly inaccurate on top of that then we can get some big variances and that much variance in salt or yeast etc. is not what a baker wants either.<br /><br />There are amazing calorie counters on smart phone apps as well as free ones on the internet. So for them to put the money into the calculator and a scale with high variance for this price rather than giving a more accurate scale seems very odd to me, except I would imagine most people wouldn't know to look.<br /><br />So I returned this...and spent the next several weeks comparing scales. I got one with 0.05 accuracy and it can fit in a drawer, I have a calorie counting book and a phone app. While this was a free gift to me, paying a few and staying thinner is a better bet to me long term.<br /><br />Do I love the calculator? I do. I think it's a brilliant idea but it attaching it to a poor scale lends it useless unfortunately. But I gave it an extra star for the calculator.<br /><br />Another issue? They included packaged foods in the calorie listing. From coaching others in weight loss one of the first things they learn is how often the calories on food pack
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4.5 out of 5 stars
4.5 out of 5
34,356 global ratings